Makers of Minnesota

Sta Active (Season 3 Episode 37)

June 23, 2021 Stephanie Hansen and Tim Porth and Rusty Wallman Season 3 Episode 37
Makers of Minnesota
Sta Active (Season 3 Episode 37)
Show Notes Transcript

Founded by four proven entrepreneurs – two physical therapists and two fitness industry veterans – Stā Active is a new company dedicated to keeping active people active. They have developed the Fiix Elbow. This is a first-ever machine to automate a proven, clinical process for people to treat lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) at home for maximum convenience, value, and long-term success.

 


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Stephanie Hansen:

Hi, this is Stephanie Hansen with the makers of Minnesota, and I am going to help you with your strategy for your business in 2021. Are you dreading social media, and not sure when you should be posting on Facebook or Instagram, or maybe you want to reach out to some influencers, but you don't know how to do it. Or maybe you just want someone to actually use your product and create some recipes for you. I am your gal. I've been developing lots of relationships over at Stephanie's dish.com. And I can help you get your product into the hands of people that are going to use it and create influence and create buying patterns for people that you can count on as new customers. 2021 is going to get all of a sudden ramped up and we're going to be moving real fast to capture some of the business opportunities that we lost in 2020. Don't be left out on the cold, have new followers and new pairs of eyes on your product. Now, give me a shout. I'd be happy to help you. I'm at [email protected] For small business marketing for things like social media, recipe development, influencer posting, and just general PR help and getting the word out about your products. Hi, this is Stephanie Hansen. And you're listening to the makers of Minnesota where we talk to cool people doing cool things throughout the state of Minnesota. I'm here today with a company that I'm pretty excited about. It's called STA active. And I'm here with the founders Rusty Wallman and Tim Porth. And you guys are on my mind for a couple of reasons. One is STA Active is a great name for a company so Amen. Number two I've been experiencing like some will call them old age or pandemic problems, posture, back pain, a bulging disc, I'm starting to have like all these old age things. And one of the things that has impacted me is thinking about how to stay active in the midst of an injury or how do you modify your activities so that you don't make your situation worse, but you stay physically active. So you guys are right on trend for me. Welcome to the program. Rusty, introduce yourself and give me an idea of kind of who does what and how you guys work together at stay active, which I should say is a is a do you call it a medical device?

Rusty Wallman:

Yeah, we would, we would call it a medical device, it's a therapeutic device, I guess would be probably a more appropriate term for it. So there's four of us as founders, two of us are physical therapists, myself, and my business partner in physical therapy. We own some private clinics in the Twin Cities area, Nate Stier. And then Tim and Dennis Lee are the former owners of Octane Fitness. So we kind of came together. We know a lot about the medical side. They know more about the equipment, fitness, industrial side of aspect of it. And that's kind of how we all kind of came together.

Stephanie Hansen:

So Tim, you're more on the, let's say, the sporty side of things. That sounds good. What was it about? What was the hole in the market that you saw?

Tim Porth:

Yeah, I know exactly. Your thoughts. Stephanie. I was I'm the guy that's getting injured. And I know how to make products. So knowing rusty and Nate, they had helped us develop fitness equipment when Dennis and I were at octane fitness. And I used to go to them regularly to their clinic or I would see him personally or have them into our office and I was always picking their brain on exactly kind of what you were after. Okay, my back's hurting, or my shoulders hurting. And one of the things that I suffered with for years was tennis elbow, and I can't remember exactly when it started spent about 10 years now, since I first had tennis elbow and I would regularly talk to the DOM and it would come and go, you know, based on the activity, so if I was lifting weights real hard, or if something you know, tennis elbow doesn't just happen from tennis, I actually don't play tennis but golfers get tennis elbow, tennis players get tennis elbow, fishermen get tennis elbow, mountain bikers due to mountain bikers, it's all it's really any activity that overloads your elbow. So repetitive drummers get it, you know, musicians will get it because even cooks and and people that are doing repetitive motions. So, yeah, it took me a little while to figure this whole thing out. But I kept picking Rusty and Nate's brain on Alright, how do I do this? And ultimately, I think the aha moment was when they said to me, if not the fact that our therapy doesn't work for you. It's the fact that your schedule really doesn't work for the therapy where I couldn't come in on, you know, two to three times a week for multiple weeks. Like And we're talking for six, eight plus weeks. There's just no way I was going to make it into a clinic for, you know, 25 minute appointment. So they said, you know how to build things? Why don't you make a machine that replicates what we do in the clinic. And that was kind of the interesting concept.

Stephanie Hansen:

So if we describe the machine, it's like a box that you kind of strap on to your elbow. Yeah, it reminded me in some ways of like a Tenz unit which I've been using on my back, which is a patch that I put on that gives like a little electrical current that helps bring blood to the area is the idea the same,

Rusty Wallman:

it's a little bit different attends unit and there's there's all sorts of different types of electric stem and intens is one of those forms. 10s is more of what you're trying to do is overload your sensory receptors, so you block your pain receptors to reduce that pain spasm cycle, ours a little bit different from a standpoint of we're trying to break up adhesions, disrupt the adhesions that are caused when you have tennis elbow, it's a tendon, it's no longer a tendinitis. And itis just means inflammation of that tendon, it now has become attended gnosis, which means it still has all the same irritations and pain and discomfort, it's just don't have no longer has the inflammation, which is can help heal the area to a certain extent. But what we tried to do were, what the machine does is break up the adhesions in that area, and then it recruits new cells to come in and heal the area. That would be the biggest difference between the two. So it's more for a tendinitis, tendinosis versus a muscle spasm in the back or in your neck that you'd use a 10s unit for.

Stephanie Hansen:

So thinking about because I always am thinking ahead, because I'm a maker too, in my mind, right? So I'm like, Oh, this is amazing, because there isn't really a lot to do for tendons other than, like you said, a lot of physical therapy, a lot of manipulation. So is this you know, we've got this on our elbow now, like bigger picture, is this something that could be applied to like an ankle or some other kinds of tendon issues down the road?

Tim Porth:

Yeah, you know, the way that we look at it, I think it's kind of twofold. Like you said, we have this box. And since you're a foodie, my only comparison that I can think of is it's about the size of a chunk Chipotle, a burrito that you strap on your arm. Yeah. And you do that you do it 10 minutes a day, three times a week. So that's like kind of part A of what we invented with it. But then the other critical part is really the therapy program that goes along with it. And what do you do. So you wear our device, it's really simple, you sit down, and you can, you know, watch TV, you can read a book, you can check your email, and you do that for 10 minutes, and you move it around a little bit, and it actually feels really good. It's like a good deep massage. But then the other part of the therapy program is just some really simple stretches, and then a little bit of strengthening as you get down down the road. And that takes maybe four minutes, five minutes a day. And it's just something that you can do by standing up and rotating your wrist. But it's the combination of like rusty talked about, we're breaking up those adhesions, and then you want to stretch, stretch out the tendons so that it heals properly. And that's why it's a long program. And that's what makes it really hard for people to stick with it. Because if you can't get to the therapy clinic, and you know, you have limited time this you can do any time of the day, you do it three times a week, we're actually developing an app that will help remind you and keep you on track, and then it will monitor your progress. So we think of it as more of a full encompassing program versus just this one device that you use.

Stephanie Hansen:

Yes. And I mean, I am a cancer survivor, too. So you're only as good as your ability to follow through on your programs to as a physical therapist, you're shaking your head because it's like, oh, yeah. Because we have all you know, you have your exercise sheet. And if you don't do it, then what's your you're just suffering and I'm in the spot now where I'm starting to feel better. And I have to remind myself that I'm only feeling better because I'm strengthening these areas. So don't quit now, friend, you're halfway through the program, you got to really complete

Rusty Wallman:

it. And I think you're right on Stephanie. I mean, we see in physical therapy, and that's kind of why we started I mean, go back to Tim's I mean, we're all busy. Doesn't matter what stage of life you're in. You always have something going on, whether it's kids activities, whether it's your own stuff that you have. So compliance is the number one issue. It doesn't matter what injury we're trying to treat, what age you are. Compliance is the hardest thing to get people to do. If you're compliant therapy works. If you're not compliant, it's not going to work. And that's it's as simple as that and trying to find something where we can give you a program that we would do in physical therapy at our clinic that you can now do at home in 15 minutes, 1015 minutes a day, that program, that you can stay consistent compliant with your success for a positive outcome and getting back to your activities that are prevented by tennis elbow, you know, your your rate of success is just going to be so much greater if we can be compliant. And that's our whole program is what we want to try to get to people is that that aspect of it.

Stephanie Hansen:

So I have no idea what it takes to get a medical device to market. So the four of you get together, does everybody throw some money into the pot? And like, Oh, we think it's gonna take this amount. And then you like everybody else probably had to spend way more than you thought. Because you always end up spending more. How hard is it to build something that you actually bring as a medical device to market because you have so many more regulations?

Rusty Wallman:

Ill let Tim take this entire answer. But I'll tell you, Stephanie, when you are only a physical therapist, you have no idea how hard it is to get there. And without the dentists and Tim, I don't I know, Nate, and I would have never got there without their expertise. There's no doubt about it.

Tim Porth:

Yeah, well, well, with that, you know, having the balance of the team is really helpful because of rusty and Nate on the the medical therapy side, you know, I don't know that. It's taking me about three minutes. It's about three years. And I think it took two and a half years for me to hear how to explain this device. So I know how to make things. And we have other people that have helped make help with the design. We've had some local consultants and stuff. So it's been a great venture for us. But the the curveball, so the team has been through physical fitness equipment before and regulatory work and that kind of approval process, but we had never really been through the FDA device protocol. So that was a new one. And that threw a curveball in and that threw some extra money, you know, to your question on budget, we we had $1, we self funded the whole venture, and we had $1 amount that we thought and, and being through this before I said, Okay, add another 20% on top of whatever I think, and we can actually came in pretty close to that. So so the the 20% slush fund helped. But COVID was an impact, you know, not an excuse, but the ability to meet with factory workers and go to suppliers and stuff was absolutely cut off. So you're trying to do that through zoom calls. And it's just not the same thing as walking through a factory, we were actually in our factory in Asia in December of 19. So kind of before this whole pandemic hit, and the good thing we were there, I'm a big believer in being there and talking directly with people and touching things and making sure things are made. Right. So that part's been a little bit of a challenge. But overall, I think we came in pretty close to our budget, we missed our timeline by about six to six to eight months. And I would say the combination of the regulatory with the FDA, and the COVID impact of not being able to go into a factory was really the driver to those that delay.

Stephanie Hansen:

Who buys this? Is it direct to consumer? Or are you selling it to chiropractic office and physical therapy offices and orthopaedists?

Tim Porth:

Yeah, it's the distribution model is direct to consumer, especially to start and we you know, we there might be an opportunity down the road to go through a traditional medical system. But right now, there's about we estimate about 10 million people in the United States with tennis elbow. And there's about 3 million Google and Bing searches of people looking for a solution. So when I looked at that, when I started doing the initial research, I thought, alright, we have a good size. And we have a lack of a solution. So a Google and Bing search really wasn't very expensive, meaning the only thing available out there really was like the armbands, which, which helped kind of mask the pain, you know, like the arm brace will map the pain but really doesn't solve this solution with which rusty can explain better. But when I looked at that recipe of 3 million searches and not a big expense, we said alright, let's approach this with direct to consumer but down the road, you know, there are opportunities where there are self insured companies that are looking for options. There are a lot of groups that we can get in front of In addition, like one new one is we are we are the now the official real tennis elbow recovery device. The US PTA, which is the the tennis organization, the largest tennis coach certification body. So that will get us in front of a whole new audience of people that can then take it to their members. And I think that'll be the creative distribution along with paid search and social will start to look at other people that we can get in front of because the solution is bottom line immediate solution works. Now we just have to find the right way to get in front of people. And then people can they can use their FSA HSA to purchase

Stephanie Hansen:

How much it is? $399? Is there an app that you're working on, like, would there be in app purchases for different things? Or is it just the straight fee? And,

Tim Porth:

yeah, straight one time fee. And that's kind of the great thing, because when you go into the traditional medical system, there's kind of this death by 1000 cuts where it's, you know, Ted, you met your deductible, you know, and then what's your copay? What's your copay, and you think you're going to go for two weeks or four weeks. And then next thing you know, you've added for for eight weeks, and the fee is a lot bigger than you ever think. And then with our device, it's durable enough that you'll be able to use it that in case tennis elbow comes back at any time later in life. You can pull it out and use the same device.

Stephanie Hansen:

I don't mean to sound bougie either. But not having that kind of pain that's continual in your your elbow, which you use a lot more than you think. 399 seems like a deal.

Tim Porth:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah, if you talk to anybody that's had chronic pain, they get it in a heartbeat. Some people think, well, I my copay is only $25. They don't realize how much that adds up down the road, and how many different things they've tried. But if you think about it as a pain solution that allows you to do the things that you either have to do, whether it's a job, like you're a plumber, or electrician, or the things you love to do, like riding a mountain bike, or fishing or golfing with your buddies. Now, that's really the key, and just

Stephanie Hansen:

how much your time is worth, you know, driving to any appointment is at least 40 minutes, usually 20 minutes or 20 minutes back, that's assuming it's kind of in your neighborhood. Yeah,

Rusty Wallman:

yeah. And there's not an Atlanta doctor's office. And then that's, I think that's our, you know, you add in the time you add, you get yourself into the medical cycle, you go to the doctor, there's a $200 visit, then you go they get an X ray to cover their ass to be honest with you, then you go to the physical therapist X number of times, I mean, you're looking at 1000s of dollars, when it's down to it, if and if you've hit your deductible, okay, you still have a copay, you still have the time that you have to get there. And that's, that's worth something that's worth a lot to most of us. So

Stephanie Hansen:

no, I mean, I'm self employed. And I have insurance. And I have the gold plan. And it's not very golden, you know, what it covers is really kind of embarrassing, other than catastrophe, and a few, you know, yearly exams, but things like acupuncture, things like massage, things like belonging to a gym, whatever those things are, none of that's covered. And all of those things are part of the treatment of having a whole well, self.

Tim Porth:

Yeah, and the other thing that I love about this program is that it's a one time fee, so you know what you're paying for. And if it doesn't work, we have a money back guarantee, it's a 90 day money back guarantee, so you can go all the way through the therapy. And if it doesn't work for you, we're confident enough that if you use this device, it really will work for you. But it's a nice thing, because you've never gone to a doctor's office where they weren't able to fix it and get your money back.

Stephanie Hansen:

True. And and it's uh, you know, bodies are different for everybody. And there are different mitigating factors and how fast you heal and what your other lifestyle factors. So are you enjoying working together? How do you there's four of you, do you have an issue of how to delineate the work?

Rusty Wallman:

I you know, it's interesting, because it's all different personalities, obviously, my business partner, Nate, in physical therapy, we're more that medical science brain, everything's very data driven. Tim is way more creative than we are by far. And that Dennis brings a finite financial background in a numbers. And so I think the different personalities work really good together. And I think it all four mixes into the plan of what we're trying to present two, as a company, it, it has been a really smooth transition to be honest with you.

Stephanie Hansen:

In effect, anyone who has suffered from this condition is your market. And you talk about SEO and search optimization and social media. One thing about social media, particularly with like Instagram, you know, it's hard. You can do lifestyle pieces, but you can't keep putting a picture of your device on Instagram and making it look hot. Do you work With someone or do you have a strategy for how you're going to present yourself? Or is it really just SEO driven? And that's the bottom line.

Tim Porth:

You know, it's a combination, I think, and it evolves, right, even as iOS 14.5 just came out, which throws privacy into a whole nother thing and the effectiveness of social media. So we want to find a lot of ways to get in front of the customer, because you got to hit them in a lot of different locations. And whether it's a tennis pro that recommends it to one of their members, or a couple people are out fishing, and somebody says, Hey, I use this device, you know, we're just trying to get the word out. So we to answer your question, we we are all new to direct to consumer, a true direct to consumer play. Traditionally, I came fitness went through distributors, dealers, and then we had a b2b side. So that's been one of the fun learnings in this venture. And we have hired an outside agency to help monitor to do the actual digital advertising spend. And then we've relied on a lot of different companies and people that we know to talk through to get, you know, best practices. And I love talking with different companies about what's worked for them, whether it's promotions, or schedules or email flow, you know, all those dirty little secrets, you know, you can talk to agencies, and they have their opinion. But then I also love to talk to the people that are on the frontline of the war. And they're handling it. So you can say, all right, what kind of promotion? How are you handling, Amazon, verstehen, website, Shopify, just all of those things. It's been, it's such a fast moving space, it's been great to learn it. And we're, we're definitely not experts, but we're doing everything we can.

Stephanie Hansen:

I would recommend to you a podcast that it's kind of funny that it's not going to seem like it would apply. But I would recommend listening to the great scrape episode that we did. This is a piece of wood that has been set up so that it it scrapes, greats of grills. And they're really learning and shared some interesting insights about direct to consumer setting up on Amazon versus your own site, doing events, SEO, and how do you protect your patent? That's the other issue that they are encountering is everyone's copying everything they do. So I would recommend listening to that. One thing that struck me about what you said, Tim, that I just want to commend you on and I think, when I look back on our business, I was the one in the business who was always like, don't tell anybody anything like we don't want to share too much. And my husband was like, we are not rocket scientists here. Nothing we are doing is not something that can be shared. And the more we share, the more information people will share with us. And the better we will be. He asked questions of everyone, he interviewed everybody. He was constantly kind of in a self deprecating way, like, oh, here's what we do. Like, I don't know if it works, but what do you do? And he would get great information from people, because he was just such a good listener? And because he would ask, so I do think that that's a big part of how you learn.

Tim Porth:

Yeah, I totally agree. And, you know, it's like, everything's on the extremes these days. You know, you've got mega companies. So you've got the apples and the Googles, and the Facebook's and the Amazons, and then you've got a whole bunch of startups and people trying to figure this game out. And the more we can communicate together, and and I'll put that out there that I'm excited to talk to any company or startup just to get more information, because that shared information, there's so you can spend hours and hours and hours digging into potential solutions and people trying to sell you stuff and everything else. But when you can talk to somebody that's fighting the same battle, and maybe it's in a different industry, but they're using the same tools, or they have a great tool that would help you I mean, that shared information is invaluable to me.

Stephanie Hansen:

And we're all when you're dealing with search engine optimization. You know, you you interview these agencies, and some are great, some are terrible. And then some are just in between. So for you to find the great, sometimes you got to go through a terrible or a few mediocres. And every product has a different outcome. So you know, you might be great at selling Chipotle a burritos on social media, but maybe not so great about a direct to consumer product that has a lifestyle component. And you only learn that by doing a lot of things that fail. So you got to hang in there long enough to find the stuff that successful and that's hard because the money you're spending is a real cash.

Tim Porth:

It is it is in one little conversation can make a huge pivot to what you're doing and just open up your eyes. Whether it's, you know, like I said some tool that gives you a little insight on analytics or what somebody is looking at or what they offer, with special I was talking to somebody yesterday, and he was actually talking about doing custom colors for their products and how that helps. So there's just all kinds of creative ideas that sometimes when you're now that we're doing this work from home thing, we're sitting in our own four walls, and we're not out there getting that shared experience.

Stephanie Hansen:

I think that's been the hardest thing about the pandemic, in some respects, you know, doing zoom calls, or being able to maximize our travel time from appointment to appointment, has has created some efficiencies. But just that breaking down the barriers, like we record this call, and I look at you and you look at me because I do video, but I don't release the video because I'm not interested in like watching your, I'm interested in how we communicate, right? I have a much better conversation with you. I feel like when I can see you, and you can see me versus if we're just doing phone. So it's interesting to see how much we will continue to utilize this tool, but also getting in front of people. Once you know we have more double vaccinated people or once we make more progress in that space. Are you noticing what the pandemic that things are changing for you, Rusty, in terms of people getting out and about more?

Rusty Wallman:

Yeah, I wouldn't say we're back to prior pre COVID yet, but in our facilities, we're definitely busier I you know, we talked to one of the things I love about my job is all the different people and personalities I get to talk to, it's just everybody's opinion and where they're out what you know, on the whole COVID front. But there are businesses that are definitely getting back to more travel. You know, we have some executive from Hershey's, I know they're traveling now. It's not back to where it was by any means. But there is more people traveling and our business has picked up I think people are less leery about getting out in public with the increase in vaccinations, more of the information that's out there. So I hope by the end of summer, we're back to normal from a clinic perspective I with that is good and bad. I have young kids, it was kind of nice stuff. When we're in COVID, you didn't have all these activities. So we're less busy. And it's kind of good. But now we're back to all those activities. And we're full full bore ahead and gone every night. So our our lifestyle has definitely changed back to really busy and, and back to everything that we're doing prior to COVID. So

Stephanie Hansen:

it's kind of funny, you mentioned that because I think on the one hand as people that weren't so so having to travel and commute, we had more time for our leisure and lifestyle activities, we got outside more we maybe I know like fishing has seen like a massive resurgence has things like cross country skiing, and tennis and pickleball. So a lot of us are rediscovering our active leisure life. But a lot of that was because we weren't as committed in some of the other things. I think I've talked to a lot of moms in particular, and everybody is like, wow, in some respects, that was great. Because I got more family time we ate more meals together, I do feel like we maybe will kind of come to the middle. And that people maybe will give up having their kids have to be in every single sport, maybe specialize in whatever it is that they like and just like value time at the cabin or time doing nothing time at home time in a canoe.

Rusty Wallman:

I definitely think you'll see it from just you know, going back to your point where boating or fishing is definitely increased. There's a patient who was in the other day who owns a dealership and I mean, trying to get a boat right now you're waiting till next winter to buy one. But I do think people will just they're gonna find a happy medium, I think we've gotten to the point that we're just so overbooked overloaded. And then and that goes back to the compliance aspect of what we're trying to do with a program is you can't be compliant. If you're so overloaded, you have three kids, and there's two of you to get or one of you to get you know, all these events, it's impossible to do. And I have three kids myself, I totally understand that the kids want to do it. They love it. So you try to do everything you can for them. But at some point time, it's just it's too much. Yeah.

Stephanie Hansen:

I think for us, too. We had a daughter that was a big downhill ski racer, and I wouldn't have traded the experience. But I also have the wisdom now to look back and go well. You know, they're not Olympians, right. So what we are focusing on is getting outdoors, healthy lifestyle, the companionship of friends, the mentorship of coaches, some of that you can get in other ways, and some of that you can get by maybe doing three quarters of the stuff instead of all of it right. Totally. Yeah, it'll be interesting to see how it does come to a happy medium. And I think to work is interesting. Let's just talk about that because obviously rusty you're doing two jobs because you've got your day job and then your we'll call this your side hustle for now. A lot of entrepreneurs they have their we'll call it their paying day job and then they have their side hustle And when you have a more flexible schedule, I think a lot of entrepreneurs, I've really been able to spend more time on their side hustles as we go back into the workplace, and there's more demands on our day to day paying jobs, that maybe changes a little bit too. Are you hoping that at some point, you guys can take this into other realms and expand,

Rusty Wallman:

I think that's exactly what we're looking at, you know, we decided to start with tennis elbow, because that's where we saw where we see one of the greatest benefits with the patients that we see. They have a hard time coming in, because it's not something that is stopping them from doing everything, but it's just an annoyance. They can't throw a ball, they can't open a jar. So they figure a different way to do it. But it's just not not affecting their quality of life to where they want to go in for therapy and spend two, three hours a week plus the money to do it, but it's definitely affecting what they want to do. Um, I definitely see us going into several different things. I you know, I think plantar fasciitis is another aspect that a lot of people have, we could see ourself going into, and then there's a couple others that we have talked about. But right now we're just really trying to hone in and try to figure out the best way to do the direct to consumer and get that all dialed in until we move to the next one.

Tim Porth:

Have you guys read the book, there's riches and niches? I have not, no, but I just saw that phrase, yesterday, I have an email, actually,

Stephanie Hansen:

I would recommend it. It, it basically, if you've got enough of a niche and a big enough market, which it sounds like you do, to really exploit that is part of the idea and to make sure that you're focusing on that and you've exploited the niche completely before you move to the next, though, if I think about just tennis elbow, and plantar fasciitis, these are like two of the most chronic annoying, debilitating things. But you're right, they're small enough that you don't need to necessarily follow through on your treatment plan because you can limp along. You can wear try different shoes and but yet, it's just constantly painful and annoying.

Tim Porth:

Yeah, you know, there's, there have been so many evolutions in disruption in industry. And one that we talked about, it's kind of similar to what we're doing is Invisalign, and smile, direct report the dynamics, you know, you don't have to go into the orthodontist on a regular basis anymore. So that's, that's a big shift. And we kind of see that same thing. And we're not diagnosing physical therapy. So there's still a market for that. But these treatments that are repetitive that we can automate, and put it on your schedule, that's really the big that that was the big aha moment here. It started out with tennis elbow, because I had done Hello. And I complained about it a lot. And rusty and Nick got tired of hearing me. But when we stood back and looked at it, whether it's plantar fasciitis or something else, how can we simplify people's lives? How can we take this direct to consumer where instead of using your health insurance, and having to try all these different solutions and finding the right clinic with the right therapist, and then your therapist leaves, you go to somebody else? Let's take that part of it out. So if you know you have tennis elbow, here's a great solution for it. Give us your credit card. If it doesn't work, you get your money back. Yeah, so it's really it's really frictionless some studies that have proved that the machine works. So now the big thing is getting it out to the masses and proving to them that it works.

Stephanie Hansen:

So how can people find you if they want to order this machine?

Tim Porth:

Yeah, right now they can either go the product itself is actually called fix elbow so they can go to fix elbow COMM And that fixed with two eyes with FI ex elbow calm, or they can go to stay active, calm, and that is sta active calm.

Stephanie Hansen:

I love talking to you guys. I'm glad that you reached out to me because on the surface of things, you know, your your we'll call it your Chipotle a burrito that you strap on your arm, like maybe not the sexiest thing in the world, but to be free from pain and to be able to enjoy the activities that you love. That's real sexy and really appealing to lots of people. So if you're listening to this podcast and you don't have these maladies, make sure that if you know someone that does you recommend them because, again, as someone who has been having pain here for the last four weeks, I am just like anything we can do to get rid of it. I am committed.

Tim Porth:

Yeah, I totally agree. I've been living with it on and off, like I said for 10 years and I've been pretty much pain free. Since we started using early prototypes. I got my skin pinched a few times and all sorts of different fun things that happened as we were developing it but we figured it out. Now we've got a nice package, you know, just like the Chipotle burrito.

Stephanie Hansen:

I love it. Well, thanks you guys for being on Makers of Minnesota. They really appreciate on that level you do. Thank you. I appreciate you and have a great day.